October 22, 2018

Rising Temperatures and Human Activity Are Increasing Storm Runoff and Flash Floods

Columbia engineers lead the first global analysis to characterize the responses of storm runoff extremes to climate and human-induced changes. The study sheds new light on rising magnitude of extreme flash floods.
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October 22, 2018

Forging a New Frontier in Climate, Food, and Nutrition

A panel discussion and book launch event held at Columbia’s Mailman School for Public Health outline how better communication can help to bridge the research divide between climate and health.
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October 19, 2018

New Data Science Method Makes Charts Easier to Read at a Glance

“Pixel Approximate Entropy” quantifies visual complexity by providing a score that automatically identifies difficult charts. The technique could help users in emergency settings to read data at a glance and make better decisions faster.
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October 18, 2018

Columbia Astrophysicist Receives 2019 New Horizons in Physics Prize

Brian Metzger, an associate professor of astrophysics, has won the Breakthrough New Horizons in Physics Prize for pioneering predictions of the electromagnetic signal from a neutron star merger, and for leadership in the emerging field of multi-messenger astronomy. 
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October 16, 2018

Columbia Neuroscientist Rafael Yuste Awarded Eliasson Global Leadership Prize

Yuste, the director of the Neuro Technology Center and co-director of the Kavli Institute of Brain Science, has pioneered the development and application of optical methods to understand how neural circuits in the cerebral cortex work.
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October 16, 2018

Tamar Mitts: New Tools to Understand Old Problems

Tamar Mitts, whose research uses big data, machine learning, and text analysis to study conflict, radicalization and violent extremism, is a faculty member at Columbia’s Data Science Institute.
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October 12, 2018

Researchers Say an 1800s Global Famine Could Happen Again

The Global Famine was one of the worst humanitarian disasters in history, killing as many people as World War II. A new analysis suggests it could happen again, only worse because of climate change.
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